Thursday, October 23, 2014

Iraq’s Remaining Cabinet Members Sworn In


On October 18, 2014 Iraq’s parliament confirmed the remaining positions in Prime Minister Haider Abadi’s government. This included the much anticipated Interior and Defense Ministers, along with all of the Kurdish officials who had been boycotting the government since it was formed in September. The Americans were pushing hard for an inclusive government that included all of Iraq’s different ethnosectarian groups, and that was achieved. That is no panacea however as Abadi’s government is made up of the same percentage of Shiite, Sunni, and Kurdish parties as Nouri al-Maliki’s former administration, which was considered a major cause of the current crisis in Iraq. The bigger question is now that Abadi’s government is complete can it break the deadlock in Baghdad and push any type of reforms that might clean up the country and help counter the insurgency.

Abadi achieved two of his and the international communities’ goals when his government was completed in October. First, he promised a smaller administration than previous ones. Iraq’s cabinet had ballooned in recent years as the winning parties pushed for more and more positions to gain access to the state’s coffers and dish out more patronage for their followers. When Nouri al-Maliki’s government was finished in April 2011 it had 40 ministers, up from the 30 that were offered up in its first manifestation in December 2010. When Abadi’s cabinet was finished it had only 29 ministers. All the winning parties also agreed to join in after much wrangling. The two main Shiite blocks State of Law and the National Alliance received 15 ministers. Sunni parties made up of Mutahidun, Arabiya, Loyalty to Anbar and the Iraq Coalition got 7 positions. The Kurdistan Democratic Party, the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, Change, the Kurdistan Islamic Union, and the Kurdistan Islamic Group got one ministry each for a total of 5. Finally, Iyad Allawi’s secular National Coalition and Science Minister Faris Youssef Jajou, a Christian politician finished off the cabinet. The Kurds were the last ones to agree to Abadi’s government. They had been making demands about the budget, oil policy, the disputed territories and other topics before and after the formation of the government, but the prime minister refused to make any concessions as he had the votes to put together his cabinet without them. The Kurds finally relented as they realized they were gaining nothing from staying away from Baghdad when decisions were being made. In the end, the breakdown of Abadi’s government was exactly like Maliki’s. The Shiite lists have 51% of the ministries compared to 52% under Maliki. The Sunnis 24%, and if you include Allawi in their camp that increases to 27% compared to 30% with the former premier. Finally, the Kurdish Coalition has 17% of the cabinet today slightly up from 15% under Maliki. The previous government was considered a disaster because the parties were deadlocked on almost every issue including not passing the 2014 budget. That showed that an inclusive government is not an answer to Iraq’s problems, but rather a cause as there are too many lists with opposing agendas all in the same house. That makes deal making and compromise nearly impossible on anything substantial.

Abadi Government
29 Ministers
Shiite Parties: 15, 51%
State of Law: 8
National Alliance: 7
Sunni Parties: 7, 24%
Arabiya: 1
Loyalty to Anbar: 1
Iraq Coalition: 1
Mutahidun: 4
Kurdish Parties: 5, 17%
Kurdistan Democratic Party: 1
Patriotic Union of Kurdistan: 1
Change: 1
Kurdistan Islamic Union: 1
Kurdistan Islamic Group: 1
Secular Parties: 1, 3%
Nationalist Coalition 1
Minorities: 1, 3%

Maliki Government
40 Ministers
Shiite Parties: 21, 52%
State of Law: 8
National Alliance: 13
Sunni Parties: 12, 30%
White Iraqiya: 1
Centralist Alliance: 2
Iraqi National Movement: 9
Kurdish Parties: 6, 15%
Kurdish Coalition: 6
Minorities: 1, 2%

Iraq’s ruling coalition was also able to agree upon Interior and Defense Ministers after much internal wrangling. Khalid Obeidi of Mutahidun was the early frontrunner for Defense Ministry that has traditionally gone to the Sunni parties. He’s from Mosul, and was a general in the Air Force under Saddam Hussein. He was the nominee by the Iraqi National Movement in 2011, but was eventually turned down when he broke with Allawi. The Accountability and Justice Commission also said Obeidi was disqualified for his Baathist past, while the Kurds accused him of taking part in anti-Kurdish operations while he served under Saddam. (1) The new Defense Minister is supposed to appeal to Sunnis, while bringing a military background to the position. Being a former Air Force general means he has some experience, but it would have been better if he’d been in the army as that would be more meaningful to his ministry. The real problem was on the Shiite side where Hadi Ameri, former Transportation Minister under Maliki and the head of the Badr Organization demanded Interior. Badr was a key component of State of Law’s victory in the election, Ameri had been put in charge of security in Diyala by the previous prime minister, and Badr was one of the militias that came to defense of the state to confront the insurgency. The United States and Sunni parties strongly objected to Ameri’s appointment. In 2005 Badr controlled the Interior and filled the police and commandos with its militiamen who were accused of running secret prisons, torturing people, carrying out sectarian arrests, and running death squads. Ameri finally stepped aside, but his party still got the ministry with Mohammed Salim al-Ghadban. Since Badr filled the Interior with its operatives before it will probably do the same this time around. Under Maliki there was no Interior Minister, while Sadoun Dulaimi was named acting Defense Minister. He was always considered the prime minister’s man. Abadi promised to fill those positions, and finally did. At the same time, these were status quo appointments. Shiite parties have historically wanted control of the Interior Ministry, because one it employs so many people it is a perfect vehicle to hand out jobs to followers, and two it gives the lists influence in every town and city in the country through the police. Likewise Sunnis have held the Defense Ministry before, and that has meant little to the insurgency or the street. The one positive is that both new ministers have talked about clearing out incompetent commanders and holding people accountable for the deterioration in security. The police and army are full of political appointees who never had business serving in any capacity. Premier Abadi has already started clearing out some of the officers, and if Obeidi and Ghadban can continue that into the lower ranks and fight the institutional corruption that would go a long way to reforming the Iraqi forces.

It’s too early to tell whether Prime Minister Abadi will be able to bring about any meaningful changes to Baghdad. He has so many structural barriers to overcome it may be impossible for any executive to reform the government. He has fulfilled some early promises such as curbing the size of the cabinet and finally appointing an Interior and Defense Minister. He’s also gotten the Kurds to give up on their boycott. It’s now up to Ghadban and Obeidi to shake up the security forces, but the former may actually make the situation worse if his militia takes over Interior like they did in the past. That’s a major reason why early on it appears that Abadi’s cabinet will be more of the same rather than a step forward.

Prime Minister Abadi’s Full Government

President Fuad Masum, Patriotic Union of Kurdistan
Vice President Nouri al-Maliki, Dawa, State of Law
Vice President Osama Nujafi, Mutahidun
Vice President Iyad Allawi, Nationalist Coalition/Wataniya

Prime Minister Haider Abadi, Dawa, State of Law
Deputy Premier Salah al-Mutlaq, al-Arabiya
Deputy Premier Rowsch Nouri Shaways, Kurdistan Democratic Party
Deputy Premier Bahaa Araji, Sadrist/Ahrar, National Alliance

Agriculture Minister Falah Hassan Zaidan, Mutahidun
Communications Minister Hassan Kadhim Rasheed, Badr Organization, State of Law
Culture Minister Fryad Rawanduzi, Patriotic Union of Kurdistan
Defense Minister Khalid al-Obeidi, Mutahidun
Education Minister Mohammed Iqbal Omar, Iraqi Islamic Party, Mutahidun
Electricity Minister Qasim Abdi Mohammed Hammadi al-Fahadawi, Loyalty to Anbar
Environment Minister Qutaiba Jabouri, Iraq Coalition
Finance Minister Hoshyar Zebari, Kurdistan Democratic Party
Foreign Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari, National Reform Trend, National Alliance
Health Minister Adilla Hamoud Hussein, State of Law
Higher Education Minister Hussein Shahristani, Independents, State of Law
Housing Minister Tariq Kinani, Sadrist/Ahrar, National Alliance
Human Rights Minister Mohammed Bayati, Badr Organization, State of Law
Industry Minister Nasir Issawi, Sadrist/Ahrar, National Alliance
Interior Minister Mohammed Salim al-Ghadban, Badr Organization, State of Law
Justice Minister Haider Zamili, Fadhila, National Alliance
Labor Minister Mohammed Shaia’a Sudani, Dawa, State of Law
Migration Minister Darbaz Mohammed, Change
Minister of State Saman Abdullah, Kurdistan Islamic Group
Municipalities Minister Abdul Karim Younis Aylan, Badr Organization, State of Law
Oil Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi, Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq, National Alliance
Planning Minister Salman Ali Hassan Jumali, Mutahidun
Provinces Minister Ahmed Abdullah, al-Arabiya
Science Minister Faris Youssef Jajou
Sports Minister Abdul Hussein Abdul Ridha Abtan, Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq, National Alliance
Tourism Minister Adel Shirshab, State of Law
Trade Minister Mlass Mohammed Husseini, Nationalist Coalition/Wataniya
Transportation Minister Bayan Jabr, Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq, National Alliance
Women’s Affairs Minister Bayan Nouri, Kurdistan Islamic Union

FOOTNOTE

1. Sowell, Kirk, “Inside Iraqi Politics No. 12,” 4/13/11

SOURCES

Kurdish Globe, “Kurdish Ministers swear in as ISIS keeps slow advancing towards Baghdad,” 10/20/14

Al Masalah, “Who is the new Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi?” 10/18/14

NINA, “Parliament Completes Vote to The Ministerial Cab,” 10/18/14

Osgood, Patrick and Smith, Daniel, “Kurds to join Cabinet despite deadlock,” Iraq Oil Report, 10/14/14

Sowell, Kirk, “Inside Iraqi Politics No. 12,” 4/13/11

Sullivan, Marisa Cochrane, “New Developments In Iraq’s Nascent Government,” Institute for the Study of War, 4/1/11

Visser, Reidar, “Additional Ministers Approved for the Iraqi Cabinet,” Iraq and Gulf Analysis, 10/18/14

Whitcomb, Alexander, “Kurds closer to participation in Iraqi government,” Rudaw, 10/13/14

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Car Bombs In Iraq Increase Casualties In 2nd Week of October 2014


Violence has been going down in Iraq since August as the insurgent summer offensive has tapered off a bit. The Islamic State is still carrying out a major campaign to take Anbar in the west, and there is heavy fighting going on in Salahaddin. In other areas like Ninewa, Kirkuk, Diyala and Babil however, militants are mostly trying to hold their ground against operations by the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) and peshmerga. That doesn’t mean there aren’t sporadic jumps in violence as happened in the second week of October 2014. The main cause of the increase was a series of deadly car bombings across the central section of the country. The result was just over 1,400 dead and wounded from October 8-14.

There was a slight rise in the number of security incidents reported in the press in the second week of October. There were 185 attacks up from 169 the previous week. That averaged out to 26.4 incidents per day compared to 22.9 seen in September, and roughly the same as August’s 26.8. That’s still down from the height of the summer offensive in June and July when there were just over 29 attacks per day.

Car bombs like this one in Kadhimiya, Baghdad on Oct 14 were the main reason why casualties increased in the second week of the month (Reuters)

From October 8-14 the media had 532 deaths and 875 wounded in Iraq. That was an increase from the 451 killed and 687 injured from October 1-7. There was a similar number of casualties in the first three weeks of September. The largest jump in fatalities occurred in Baghdad, which went from 77 dead in the 1st week of October to 171 the next. That governorate also accounted for just over half of the wounded with 453. That was to be expected as the beginning of the month saw the fewest attacks in the capital of 2014, while the second week saw some very costly car bombings. Salahaddin was the second deadliest province with 140 killed, followed by 93 in Diyala more than doubling the first week’s 41, 44 in Anbar, 39 in Babil, 37 in Ninewa, 7 in Kirkuk, and one in Basra.


Violence In Iraq By Week 2014
Date
Incidents
Dead
Wounded
Jan 1-7
244
363
733
Jan 8-14
272
364
676
Jan 15-21
205
358
616
Jan 22-28
236
305
618
Jan 29-31
57
93
237
JAN
1,014
1,483
2,880
Feb 1-7
204
296
700
Feb 8-14
226
258
505
Feb 15-21
264
346
703
Feb 22-28
251
374
618
FEB
945
1,274
2,526
Mar 1-7
253
412
702
Mar 8-14
206
324
612
Mar 15-21
216
423
736
Mar 22-27
211
279
580
Mar 28-31
110
168
271
MAR
996
1,606
2,901
Apr 1-7
238
259
550
Apr 8-14
223
362
646
Apr 15-21
251
406
786
Apr 22-28
226
347
744
Apr 29-30
61
82
179
APR
999
1,456
2,905
May 1-7
198
246
483
May 8-14
257
469
752
May 15-21
183
256
426
May 22-28
204
407
817
May 29-31
63
90
132
MAY
905
1,468
2,610
Jun 1-7
224
588
1,021
Jun 8-14
227
1,238
891
Jun 15-21
171
758
754
Jun 22-28
200
720
775
Jun 29-30
56
127
236
JUN
878
3,431
3,677
Jul 1-7
200
511
622
Jul 8-14
211
577
625
Jul 15-21
225
398
1,000
Jul 22-28
222
549
801
Jul 29-31
65
162
230
JUL
923
2,197
3,278
Aug 1-8
268
1,121
885
Aug 9-14
178
709
1,152
Aug 15-21
150
354
499
Aug 22-28
178
523
798
Aug 29-31
58
118
289
AUG
832
2,825
3,623
Sep 1-7
168
616
751
Sep 8-14
156
932
722
Sep 15-21
166
620
749
Sep 22-28
153
395
573
Sep 29-30
44
110
241
SEP
687
2,673
3,036
Oct 1-7
169
451
687
Oct 8-14
185
532
875

Violence In Iraq By Province Oct 1-14, 2014
Province
Oct 1-7
Oct 8-14
Anbar
39 Incidents
145 Killed: 78 ISF, 13 Sahwa, 54 Civilians
136 Wounded: 43 ISF, 7 Sahwa, 86 Civilians
27 Shootings
5 IEDs
3 Car Bombs
1 Suicide Car Bomb
2 Suicide Bombers
37 Incidents
44 Killed: 9 ISF, 4 Sahwa, 31 Civilians
56 Wounded: 3 Sahwa, 53 Civilians
28 Shootings
2 IEDs
2 Suicide Car Bombs
Babil
10 Incidents
17 Killed: 3 ISF, 14 Civilians
64 Wounded: 4 ISF, 60 Civilians
1 Shooting
7 IEDs
1 Sticky Bomb
10 Incidents
39 Killed: 2 ISF, 37 Civilians
26 Wounded: 4 ISF, 22 Civilians
8 Shootings
2 IEDs
Baghdad
27 Incidents
77 Killed: 3 ISF, 2 Sahwa, 72 Civilians
212 Wounded: 3 ISF, 2 Sahwa, 207 Civilians
4 Shootings
11 IEDs
4 Sticky Bombs
2 Car Bombs
1 Suicide Car Bomb
36 Incidents
171 Killed: 5 ISF, 166 Civilians
453 Wounded: 1 ISF, 452 Civilians
5 Shootings
20 IEDs
3 Sticky Bombs
2 Car Bombs
5 Suicide Car Bombs
2 Suicide Bombers
Basra
2 Incidents
1 IED
2 Incidents
1 Killed: 1 Civilian
1 Shooting
Diyala
17 Incidents
41 Killed: 30 ISF, 8 Peshmerga, 3 Civilians
34 Wounded: 20 ISF, 8 Peshmerga, 2 Sahwa, 4 Civilians
12 Shootings
5 IEDs
2 Suicide Bombers
24 Incidents
93 Killed: 8 ISF, 31 Peshmerga, 54 Civilians
152 Wounded: 6 ISF, 4 Peshmerga, 142 Civilians
9 Shootings
16 IEDs
4 Suicide Car Bombs
Kirkuk
11 Incidents
2 Killed: 2 Civilians
24 Wounded: 4 Peshmerga, 20 Civilians
3 Shootings
3 IEDs
1 Motorcycle Bomb
1 Suicide Car Bomb
8 Incidents
7 Killed: 1 ISF, 2 Peshmerga, 4 Civilians
30 Wounded: 5 ISF, 4 Peshmerga, 21 Civilians
7 Shootings
1 Motorcycle Bomb
Ninewa
11 Incidents
53 Killed: 53 Civilians
5 Shootings
1 IED
10 Incidents
37 Killed: 37 Civilians
8 Shootings
2 IEDs
Salahaddin
52 Incidents
116 Killed: 44 ISF, 6 Sahwa, 66 Civilians
217 Wounded: 49 ISF, 15 Sahwa, 153 Civilians
25 Shootings
33 IEDs
2 Car Bombs
5 Suicide Car Bombs
2 Suicide Bombers
58 Incidents
140 Killed: 59 ISF, 3 Sahwa, 78 Civilians
158 Wounded: 48 ISF, 3 Sahwa, 107 Civilians
25 Shootings
53 IEDs
1 Sticky Bomb
7 Car Bombs
1 Suicide Car Bomb
1 Suicide Bomb


In the first two weeks of October, the number of vehicle borne improvised explosive devices (VBIEDs) launched by the Islamic State (IS) went from 15 to 22. That was the main driver of the increase in casualties in the country. 221 people were killed and 461 wounded by car bombs the second week. October 11 saw twelve detonated in Amiriya Fallujah in Anbar, Kadhimiya and two in Shula in Baghdad, and one in the west of Tikrit, one in Shajarat al-Dor, two in Tikrit and four on Camp Speicher in Salahaddin. Those killed 86 people and injured 164. That day showed how IS is using these devices to both stoke sectarian tension by hitting Shiite neighborhoods of the capital as well as using them as part of attacks on hard targets like Camp Speicher.

Car Bomb Attacks In Iraq Oct 2014
Date
Location
Dead
Wounded
Oct. 1
New Baghdad, Baghdad
17
59
Oct. 2
Hit x3, Anbar
Great Dam, Diyala
Balad, Salahaddin
46
35
Oct. 3
Outside Samarrra & Tuz Kharmato, Salahaddin
3
8
Oct. 4
Baiji & Tikrit, Salahaddin
12
24
Oct. 5



Oct. 6



Oct. 7
Hit, Anbar
Mashtal & Arboretum, Baghdad
Abassid & Amerli, Salahaddin
40
78
1st Wk Oct Totals
15
118
204
Oct. 8
Garma, Anbar
Sadr City, Baghdad
12
33
Oct. 9
Baquba, Diyala
9
11
Oct. 10



Oct. 11
Amiriya Fallujah, Anbar
Kadhimiya & Shula x2, Baghdad
West of Tikrit, Shajarat al-Dor, Tikrit x2, Camp Speicher x4, Salahaddin
86
164
Oct. 12
Qara Tapa, Diyala x3
Samarra, Salahaddin
58
111
Oct. 13
Sadr City & Kadhimiya, Baghdad
31
86
Oct. 14
Kadhimiya, Baghdad
25
56
2nd Wk Oct Totals
22
221
461

Casualties From Government Shelling & Air Strikes In Iraq Oct. 2014
Date
Location
Dead
Wounded
Oct. 1
Fallujah, Anbar

6
Oct. 3
Fallujah, Anbar
4
11
Oct. 4
Rabad, Salahaddin
3
5
Oct. 6
Hit, Anbar
15


Fallujah, Anbar
1
8

Rabia, Ninewa
12

Oct. 7
Fallujah, Anbar
3
5

Khalidiya, Anbar
5
7
1st Wk Oct Totals
-
43
42
Oct. 8
Fallujah, Anbar
7
16

Tikrit, Salahaddin
14

Oct 9
Dour, Salahaddin
7
3
Oct. 10
Fallujah, Anbar
4
13
Oct. 11
Fallujah, Anbar
2
6
Oct. 14
Fallujah, Anbar
3
3

Baiji, Salahaddin
4

2nd Wk Oct Totals
-
41
41


Anbar is the major focus of the Islamic State currently. Since August it has been attempting to seize the province, and in early October it had a major breakthrough when it took Hit and the surrounding towns. In the second week of October IS was carrying out attacks upon towns and cities across the governorate, while the ISF and tribes were trying to counter attack on the perimeter of the urban areas and within Ramadi. For the week there was fighting in Hit, Baghdadi, Saqlawiya, Siger, Ramadi, Albu Jassim, Garma, Haditha, Zekhaikha, Shaiya, Abu Risha, Amiriya Fallujah, and Furat. Some towns like Baghdadi are completely surrounded by the militants and making urgent calls for relief. The insurgency also scored a tactical victory when it was able to assassinate the provincial police chief in Aub Risha on October 12 with an IED on his motorcade. Despite all the violence the governorate actually saw a decrease in casualties with 44 killed and 56 wounded compared to 145 deaths and 136 injured the first week of October. Overall, Anbar remains in a precarious situation as IS is threatening to take more sections of the province.

The Iraqi Security Forces and militias are still trying to secure sections of northern Babil. The thirteenth clearing operation was coming to a close from October 8 to 14 focusing upon Jurf al-Sakhr, Latifiya, and Iskandiriya. On October 12 for example, Sadr’s Peace Brigades claimed it had freed two villages in the lakes region of Iskandiriya. The ISF and militias might have also been responsible for 36 bodies that were found in an irrigation ditch near an army base in Mahaweel on October 14. Despite all the effort expended in the province by government forces and its allies very little has changed. IS is still entrenched in sections of northern Babil.

Baghdad saw the largest increase in violence due to seven car bombs. These struck Shula, Sadr City twice and Kadhimiya three times. In total, 122 people lost their lives and another 300 were injured. These were all in Shiite neighborhoods, and were meant to create more divisions and push the country towards civil war. There was also a rise in IEDs going from 11 to 20 from the first to second week of the month adding to the casualty count.

There was an uptick in casualties in Diyala as well. The number of dead and wounded rose from 41 and 34 respectively from October 1-7 to 93 and 152 from October 8-14. The main reason was three suicide car bombs on the offices of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan in Qara Tapa on October 12. 58 were killed and 107 wounded as a result. This was a build up to an assault upon the town in the third week of October. There were also several clashes between IS and the peshmerga in Jalawla, which was taken during the summer. Finally, there was continued clashes in the Hamrin Mountains, which both the ISF and peshmerga claimed to have cleared last month.

In Kirkuk there was a return to terrorist attacks in the city, with more fighting in the east. On October 10 there was a drive by on a police patrol, and a motorcycle bomb on a restaurant on October 13 in Kirkuk City. Provincial officials have warned of an impending offensive against the city, but that has not materialized yet. Fighting also continued in the eastern section of the province in Daquq district with the peshmerga.

Fighting in Kirkuk has concentrated in eastern Daquq with terrorist attacks upon Kirkuk City (Wikipedia)

Central Ninewa remains under insurgent control. In Mosul and Baaj, IS has been at work executing people. In total, the group killed 33 during the week that included a former parliamentarian, a lawyer, a reporter, and two ex-soldiers. The organization also issued a notice that students in Mosul could not take their exams in Kirkuk fearing that they would not come back. According to Radio Free Iraq, it has also failed to get most city employees back at work as the city is strewn with garbage. In the north, the peshmerga claimed they were starting a push to free Sinjar on October 11. That might have been in response to IS gaining control of all of the roads leading to Mount Sinjar trapping around 10,000 people there. Sinjar is one of the historic homelands of the Yazidis who faced a genocidal campaign by the Islamic State when it took the area in August. Those that remained in the region are now under threat again.

Besides Anbar, Salahaddin has remained the other major battlefront since the summer offensive started. On October 11, IS carried out seven car bombs hitting Tikrit, Camp Speicher, Shajarat al-Dor, and an area west of Tikrit killing 32 and wounding 39. The bombing of Camp Speicher was part of an attempt to seize the base, while the attacks on Shajarat al-Dor and west of Tikrit were aimed at the ISF and volunteers. IS is also trying to take Baiji refinery once again. On October 8 it was able to shoot down an army helicopter in the area. The siege of Dhuluiya was finally ended, but fierce clashes continued there. The ISF and peshmerga also claimed to have cleared all of the Tuz Kharmato district in eastern Salahaddin. The ISF and volunteers also took Hajaj outside of Tikrit in its attempt to cordon off the city.

SOURCES

Agence France Presse, "Car bomb kills 12 in Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad," 10/9/14

AIN, "ISIL attack foiled in northern Karma," 10/10/14

Alsumaria, "Two soldiers killed by four car bombs on Speicher base north of Tikrit," 10/11/14

Aswat al-Iraq, "4 soldiers killed, 8+ wounded west of Tikrit," 10/11/14
- "7 killed, 3 children wounded in military bombardment in Salahal-din province," 10/9/14

Buratha News, "24 martyrs and 54 injured toll of Kadhimiya blast north of Baghdad," 10/14/14
- “Peace Brigades announces the liberation of two villages north of Babylon terrorists “Daash”,” 10/12/14

Daragahi, Borzou, “Isis fighters seize key military base in Iraq’s Anbar province,” Financial Times,

Al Forat, "18 persons injured in bike-bomb explosion in Kirkuk," 10/13/14
- “Areas of Qaragoul & Albu Haswa liberated near Dujail,” 10/14/14
- “ISF wage wide attack targeting ISIL in Salah-il-Din,” 10/9/14
- “Tikrit: ISF & volunteers purge al-Hajjaj silo from ISIL,” 10/10/14

Independent Press Agency, "60 dead and wounded toll of Kazimiyah bombing north of Baghdad," 10/11/14

Kurd Press, "Triple suicide attacks kills 30 Kurdish forces in Iraq," 10/12/14

Al Mada, "Killing and wounding 23 civilians in pounding on Fallujah," 10/8/14
- "Toll rises Kazimiyah blasts and Shula again to 199 dead and wounded," 10/11/14

NINA, "11 elements of the (IS) killed in Amiriyat al-Fallujah," 10/11/14
- "14 people, killed and wounded mostly women and children, in Tikrit," 10/8/14
- "/17/ Civilians killed and wounded by bombing in Fallujah," 10/10/14
- "35 bodies found in Mahaweel, north of Hilla," 10/14/14
- "Eight members of one family killed and wounded in artillery bombardment on Fallujah," 10/11/14
- "Four people injured by unidentified gunmen in southern Kirkuk," 10/10/14
- "The IS carried out the death sentence against a journalist in Mosul," 10/14/14
- "The IS carried out the death sentence on two doctors and a precedent parliamentarian in Mosul," 10/8/14
- "The IS elements executed a lawyer in central Mosul," 10/10/14
- "The IS executes two officers in the former Iraqi army, four bodies found in Mosul," 10/13/14
- "Martyrdom A citizen and a child killed in a strike by a drone plane in Baiji," 10/14/14
- "MP Ahmed al-Khafaji got martyrdom in the bombing of Kadhimiyah," 10/14/14
- "Three car bombs in Tikrit kill and wound 59 people, including volunteers," 10/11/14
- "Three policemen and a civilian wounded in a car bomb in Samarra," 10/13/14

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, "At Least 67 Dead In Iraqi Bombings, As Troops Battle IS Militants, 10/12/14
- “Shi'ite Iraqi Lawmaker Among 25 Killed By Baghdad Bombing, 10/14/14

Radio Free Iraq, "14 October 2014," Daily Updates from Anbar, 10/14/14
- “14 October 2014,” Daily Updates from Nineveh, 10/14/14

Al Rayy, "The high number of victims of explosion in east 39 martyrs and wounded," 10/13/14
- "Two volunteers martyred and a civilian and his daughter in two separate incidents in Salahuddin," 10/14/14

Salaheddin, Sinan and Yacoub, Sameer, "Triple suicide bombing in Iraq kills 58 people," Associated Press, 10/12/14

Al-Salhy, Suadad, "'Iraq is now like a drowning man,'" Al Jazeera, 10/13/14

Shafaq News, "First female officer in Peshmarga killed in clashes with ISIS terrorists in Kirkuk," 10/11/14

Yacoub, Sameer, "Suicide Attack Kills 9 in Iraq," Associated Press, 10/9/14